What to do When You’re Injured

I just had hip surgery yesterday.  It was a looong day at the hospital. Got up at 5am to get to the hospital for 6:15.  Checked in.  Got to put on one of those wonderful little hospital gowns that showed my butt to the world.  Surgery at 7:40. Surgery went really well.  They went in to clean up a torn labrum and then they notched out the head of my femur to help me with range of motion.  Oh, and I’ve got a little arthritis in there too so they did some micro-fractures to help promote healing.  I’m on crutches for a month. Did I mention I’m only 38 years old?  But I can trace the beginnings of this injury way back to eighth grade lacrosse.  I was in the middle school but I was playing lacrosse for the upper school because I was the best goalie.  I developed a tear in my left quad that I kept tearing and tearing and tearing.  The trainer just kept telling me to ice it.  And because I had a pretty high pain tolerance, I kept playing.  But what happened because of that was I developed a hole in my quad that never healed.  I played around it.  I compensated.  Stepping to the ball was a non issue because stepping to the ball killed. But I played.  Took one for the team.  But didn’t realy think about the long-term effect on my play.  What I really needed back then was a back up goalie. And a trainer that could say, “If you keep playing on this you’re going to really hurt yourself...
How Long Should a Lacrosse Goalie Stick Be?

How Long Should a Lacrosse Goalie Stick Be?

Question: My son play goalie for his high-school LAX team and stand about 6ft  I was wondering what you would recommend his stick length to be, a balance of being able to maneuver in the net yet interfere with passes. Answer: Mark my stick is 46″ in length and I’m 5’8″.  This is the shortest I would ever go. At that length it is 68% of my total height.  My recommendation is to keep total stick length (including head) between 68 and 73% of total height in inches.  Start on the high end, and then go shorter in one inch increments until you find the right length for your son. For a six foot tall goalie that would mean 52.5 inches on the long end and 49 inches on the short end. I wouldn’t trade length for cutting down passes if it makes stopping the ball awkward.  This is remnants of old school thinking that a goalies stick should be able to cut down passes like a defender would. A goalies primary objective is to stop the ball.  At six feet your son has good height already to help knock down passes without sacrificing body position.  But you should never add inches to cut down passes if those inches restrict the goalie from stopping the ball or dodging and passing out of the cage. Hope that helps!  Let me know how it goes. Jonathan –  The Goalie Guru P.S. Are you a member of Lacrosse Goalie University? Why not become one and get personalized coaching from Coach Edwards all for less than the price of a DVD.  Click here...
How To Stop Giving Rebounds – LacrosseGoalieTips.com

How To Stop Giving Rebounds – LacrosseGoalieTips.com

How To Stop Giving Rebounds Giving rebounds is a challenge for most lacrosse goalies.  In today’s post Coach Edwards talks about how to stop giving rebounds to a young female lacrosse goalie who is having problems.  If you have trouble giving rebounds be sure to leave a comment below so we can continue to the conversation. Question: Hi Jonathan! Thanks for the help. I was wondering if you could help me out with the rebounding. I can save the ball but i just can’t keep it in my stick. I think my pocket is pretty deep so I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. Thanks! Emma Answer: Emma you need to relax your hands a bit but this comes with practice.  As you get more comfortable with the speed of the shots you will catch more.  Your brain will make the fine tune adjustments so that you can catch and not just block the ball.  Don’t worry, it happens to all of us.  You can also be moving so well to the ball that it’s hitting right in the center of the pocket and bouncing out.  That will happen no matter how deep the pocket is.  If you catch the ball a little bit off center that can help.  Also, if you punch your pocket the opposite way so that it’s sticking out towards the shooter, this can help a bit because the pocket then cushions the ball a bit.  It’s a little thing that can help. You’ll get it.  Let me know if that helps though! Coach Edwards Another Tip To Stop Giving Rebounds P.S.  A common problem...
Clears for Lacrosse Goalies – Which Goalie Should I Go With?

Clears for Lacrosse Goalies – Which Goalie Should I Go With?

Question: I have two goalies on my high school team, one is a sophomore and is relatively new to the position and has a great eye for shots and makes a lot of big saves. he has put in a lot of work during our off-seasons to improve his play. his only knock on him is that due to his in-experience, he has trouble seeing open players on clears. he can pass well, he just has trouble seeing open players. the other goalie is a junior who has played the position since he started so he knows where to look on clears. he can stop shots but doesn’t have the same talent as the sophomore. in your coaching experience, which goalie would make the better main-man? Answer: This isn’t an easy answer as there are a lot of factors that you as a coach have to weigh. That being said, if they are in fact equal with the exception of the clearing I would always go with the younger goalie in the hopes that he is going to be a better goalie once that problem is fixed. Who Stops The Ball Better First off: Who is the better ball stopper? This is really where you need to start. If a goalie is a good clearer but he/she can’t stop the ball it doesn’t really matter how well he clears if he can’t stop the thing. Secondly: Clearing is a team game. What I find is that goalies who have clearing issues but who have good stick skills need to do a couple of things: 1) They need to relax...